itsmattyeaah

Anyone into producing/making music?

2 posts in this topic

I was wondering if anyone who produces music can give me some opinions on how to improve my mix.  I am self-taught and have been playing music for the past 8 years.  I recently started getting into music production over the past couple of years, but I have been on and off with it due to school.  I have been recording as a hobby while on break from school.

 

I re-edited Interstate from the EP in the post and I want to know if my mix is improving?  I really want to know how to get a solid mix, but without having to get it professionally done.  Like I said, this is just a hobby for myself.  I have no intentions of trying to get things mastered or produced by an actual engineer, but I just want to learn more about the basics of production and how I can get a decent mix on my own.

 

Interstate (new mix):

http://www115.zippyshare.com/v/oWxr108K/file.html

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Most issues aren't in the mix itself, but how each instrument is recorded. How many mics do you use for your drums and where do you position them? Do you use a stereo matched pair of cardioids for the overheads? Do you mic up a guitar amp in an isolation room or through amp modelers in your DAW? What kind of mic do you use to record vocals? Do you record them in a booth, closet, or open room? The better and more tight your tracking process is, the less you have to do once it comes time to mix. So it's hard to critique when you don't know how the sausage gets made, so to speak.

The first thing would be to soundproof what you use as your control room, you want as little reverberations as possible. Next would be to make your closet or wherever your record vocals to be completely dead (this is also where you would record your guitars). Next would be to fine tune the drum room, putting up padding to eliminate any unnecessary ringing from any exposed brick or reflective surfaces. After that you'd want to invest in a good set of microphones. Having an 8+ input interface with quality A/D converters and using high quality cabling from companies such as Mogami or Monster will also give you better results. Once you have a proper set up, you'll see how little you have to do when it comes time to mix.

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7 hours ago, HyperDose said:

Most issues aren't in the mix itself, but how each instrument is recorded. How many mics do you use for your drums and where do you position them? Do you use a stereo matched pair of cardioids for the overheads? Do you mic up a guitar amp in an isolation room or through amp modelers in your DAW? What kind of mic do you use to record vocals? Do you record them in a booth, closet, or open room? The better and more tight your tracking process is, the less you have to do once it comes time to mix. So it's hard to critique when you don't know how the sausage gets made, so to speak.

The first thing would be to soundproof what you use as your control room, you want as little reverberations as possible. Next would be to make your closet or wherever your record vocals to be completely dead (this is also where you would record your guitars). Next would be to fine tune the drum room, putting up padding to eliminate any unnecessary ringing from any exposed brick or reflective surfaces. After that you'd want to invest in a good set of microphones. Having an 8+ input interface with quality A/D converters and using high quality cabling from companies such as Mogami or Monster will also give you better results. Once you have a proper set up, you'll see how little you have to do when it comes time to mix.

I use:

Drums - programmed through FPC on FL Studio

Guitar - ESP LTD-1000 w/ a Digitech RP155 Modeling Processor

VOX - Roland Tri-Capture w/ an Audio Technica AT2020

 

I see what you mean.  As much as I would want to do all of this, I am on a tight budget while being in school and I would not wish to get as serious as getting tons of equipment.  I really only have the bare minimum for recording, which is all I can afford at the moment.  

 

But thanks for the feedback! I understand what you mean as far as factoring in where I record and what the environment is like.  Unfortunately, I share this room and it was more of me just casually using it to record.  I did not factor any sense into it, more just I want to make music and see what comes of it before I end up too busy to do these things.

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